Gunmetal Grey & Canary Yellow

They’re an odd and beautiful combo, gun metal grey and canary yellow.  I wanted this color combo for my recent wedding and my step-dad suggested that we give away gunmetal grey bullets as our favors.  I rather liked the idea.

If you live in Los Angeles, Orange County, Texas, or NYC, you must visit The Dry Bar.  Delicious mimosas, fabulous music, Pretty Woman playing on the flat screens, the menu of hairstyles, ridiculously cheap blowouts… But especially, the gunmetal grey and canary yellow.

There is a yellow hairdryer chandelier, stainless steel counters, grey textured walls covered in black & white photos of old movie starlets, ultra-fem, modern mirrors, clean, sleek scene that is padded with warmth in rustic wood shelving, massive fish bowls with layers of cacti, white wash sinks with taupe damask walls… Its the perfect amount of girly without being sissy.

Gunmetal grey strikes an old, wild west image in my head – all things Bonanza and Clint Eastwood, shoot offs and show downs, the women in John Wayne movies.  In contrast, canary yellow is pungently happy – bright birds and bridesmaids, Mustangs and Trans Ams, the brilliantly beautiful canary diamond.

The parallel images hardly seem to ever intersect.  I’ve discovered across my life that two seemingly disconnected worlds intersect often and regularly.  Think about how interesting dissonance makes music.  And cognitive dissonance is the crux of critical decisions that result in our character being tested and hopefully, positively changed.

Sometimes I don’t feel like I truly fit in anywhere.  I have different friendship circles, many – but not all – which layer in a wonderful way.  I have a job I am passionate about and serve in the gutters of LA with people who’d do anything for a stranger and I love the expedited process of becoming family by purpose.  Some of my friendships are so old we can read expressions, eyeballs, body language – dialogue is still critical, and somehow unnecessary.  Some of my buds are so fun, so intelligent, and so new that we don’t laugh when the other would like us to or we cry at past stories the teller is laughing at.  We misread each other in the learning and merging of gunmetal grey and canary yellow.

Some of my heroes had colorful pasts, random pathways, and carried the intersection of gunmetal grey and canary yellow throughout their destiny.  Abe Lincoln, for instance, was a self-taught man with limited political experience, grandpa killed by Native Americans and family deaths swarming his childhood; he battled depression, lost a son to death, and fought an almost impossible war against slavery in America.  Finally, he issued the Emancipation Proclamation, delivered the Gettysburg Address and emerged brilliant and bright in the midst of dark and death.

More of my heroes, Eleanor Roosevelt, Mother Teresa, Esther the Queen of Persia, the Apostle Paul, Jonathan – friend to King David, even Jesus all led lives of mergers and acquisitions, acquiring people, life, forgiveness and love, while merging worlds that do not easily or readily collide.  This is the stuff world changing leaders are made of.

When I remember this, I am thankful I don’t always feel I have just the right place in this world and I am grateful I’m made of shoot offs and show downs, Mustangs and Trans Ams, the wild, wild west and brilliant canary yellows.

“If I find in myself desires nothing in this world can satisfy, I can only conclude that I was not made for here.” CS Lewis

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